Tag Archive for fired examples

Mammoth project

Collaborative terracotta mammoth made by families at WM&AG and Eastnor PotteryThis rather striking terracotta mammoth was made by Jon the Potter at Worcester Museum and Art Gallery. Families were invited to drop by and help make the ice age beast as part of an exciting year long project called Lost Landscapes of Worcestershire. The project culminates in the summer of 2018 with an exhibition at both the Museum in Forgate Street and The Hive.

You can’t rush art

A potter's wheel pot turned into a giraffe by a creative child at Eastnor Pottery & The Flying Potter

Customers are sometimes surprised at the length of time it takes before they can collect their ceramic masterpieces.

We work on a completion period of one month from day of making.

Most of this time is drying time, dedicated to ensuring the work is bone dry through-out. If you attempt to fire a wet or slightly damp pot, the water in the clay will bubble and steam at 100 degrees on the kiln’s accent to 1000 degrees. As you can probably imagine the boiling water causes catastrophic damage to the clay with objects prone to exploding or splitting apart.

The first firing is called the bisque firing and takes a couple of days. When the pots emerge from the kiln, they have made an irreversible transition. They are now ceramic, but are still quite soft and porous.

The bisque pots are dipped into a bucket of un-melted glass particles in suspension. The glaze particles cling to the surface of the pot forming a layer of powder resembling a heavy frost.

Ethan glazing course participants pots at eastnor pottery

 

Once the bottoms of the pots have been wiped clear of glaze, they are loaded back into the kiln for a second ‘glaze’ firing.  The pots are fired higher this time to a temperature of 1080 degrees Celsius. This allows the glaze particles to melt, forming a smooth glassy surface on top of the ceramic.

Two days later, the finished items are unloaded from the kiln.

ethan unloading kilns at eastnor pottery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phew! So much process, so much time!

Nursery tree

arranging ceramic tiles at eastnor pottery

Our lovely community arts apprentices Aimme and Immy working with Sarah on the final touches of a stunning tile panel made by children, parents and staff at Washwood Heath Nursery School in Birmingham.

Although the practical sessions are of paramount importance and integral to our practice, it’s worth pointing out the value of preparation and after-care we attach to every project.

We reckon for every minute spent working with somebody hands-on, there is at least a minute of preparation and after-care.

This collaboration will be hung on the outside wall of the new Clover Lea Annex building designed for the provision of the under 2’s.

Hard to shake!

Pottery mans face made by a customer at Eastnor Pottery & The Flying PotterWe usually start a session in a school with a discussion about the many uses of clay and pottery. When posed with the question “what objects do you think of when you think of pottery?” the children’s answers are predictable – mugs, cups, plates, bowls…. etc. Not so at Finstall First School in Bromsgrove! A YR4 had us in stitches with his answer “old people!” lol

Some stereo types are so deeply ingrained!

Variety is the spice…

Hand made mug made by workshop participant at Eastnor Pottery in West MidlandsEach pot made on a potter’s wheel by a first time participant is totally unique. The shape is as individual to its maker as their very own fingerprint – everybody holds their hands in a different way.

Once participants have experienced the joys of making a pot, they are offered the opportunity to further individualise their freshly thrown ware by decorating with coloured slips and underglazes.

The variety of approach to colour and theme is awe inspiring. Just take a look at the multitude of effects (and shapes) of these recently fired & glazed customer creations.

A sample of Eastnor Pottery’s customers creations made on the potter’s wheel and hand decorated.

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