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mobile pottery studio eastnor pottery and the flying pottery facilitated drop-in pottery workshops at countrytastic in malvern


It’s HOME LEARNING week here at Eastnor Pottery!

Over the next five days we are going to sign posting you to our fabulous and FREE ‘how to make pottery’ video tutorials over on our YouTube channel.

Each day we’ll be highlighting a different video and making technique:

MONDAY 18 January – Coil pot owl.

TUESDAY 19 January – Slab built house.

WEDNESDAY 20 January – Potter’s wheel.

THURSDAY 21 January – Pinch pot monster

FRIDAY 22 January – Pottery fish.

In the absence of a kiln, you can let your creations dry and then seal them with a mixture of PVA glue and water (50/50 mix) – a couple of coats should do the job. Once the PVA has dried, you can paint your creations with acrylic paint, or whatever you can lay your hands on!

Even if you don’t have any proper clay, the projects work well with play dough to.

Happy Making! Oh and if you get chance, we’d love to see what you get up to. Just send us a photo of your finished work to any of our social media platforms and we’ll share and comment on your creativity. We’re @eastnorpottery on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

home potter james potter's wheel

young pottery enthusiast and his shiny new potter's wheel

James (above) has attended our Introduction to the Potter’s Wheel class on a several occasions. Prior to Lockdown #2, James, along with his Mum and Aunty, took the ‘next step’ and indulged in one of our full day Potter’s Wheel Courses.

Fair to say, James has been bitten by the bug and his dedication to the cause in one so young is totally inspiring. We asked James a few questions:

How long have you been working with clay?

When I knew that we were having time off school due to COVID in March, my Aunty Sue suggested I take up a new hobby. I had already been to Eastnor Pottery a couple of times and after watching the Great Pottery Throw Down, I was inspired to buy a Potter’s Wheel. I researched on the internet and found one which suited me and it arrived within a week. Since then, I have converted Mum’s outside shed into my ‘Potter’s Shed’ and whilst in lockdown, I was in there every day. Now I am back at school, my time in the shed is limited to the weekends when Sue often comes on a Sunday morning for a session.

What inspires you to make things?

The Great Pottery Throw Down was a big influence for my creations. Sue also bought a book for my birthday called “Simon Leach’s Pottery Handbook” which has many helpful tips and ideas. I also get inspired by the outside world, such as when we went to Borth for a day trip in the Summer, I saw a mosaic painting on the sea defense wall and I came home and had a go at making a mosaic using air dry clay.

What’s the best piece of artwork you have ever made? (doesn’t have to be clay)

I have tried many different crafts including knitting, rug making and sewing but very proud of making three miniature pots which I am working on at the moment. These include a cream jug, a flared pot and a mustard pot with a spoon.

home potter james potter's wheel

childrens hands in wet squidgy clay at cheltenham science festival 2019

childrens hands in wet squidgy clay at cheltenham science festival 2019Under normal circumstances (remember them!?) we’d have been up to our eyeballs in clay at the brilliant Maker Shack as part of Cheltenham Science Festival.

We’ve been involved in the Makershack since its inauguration in 2017. Last year we encouraged visitors to make a press molded brick, using real brick clay from Coleford Brick and Tile Company based in the Forest of Dean.

The bricks were assembled into a giant castle and we worked with nearly 10,000 people over the x6 days of the festival! – that’s a shed load of bricks! The sheer volume of visitors meant we had to build a fresh structure each day, deconstructing the building at the close and re-claiming the material for the next morning.

Athough the Makershack was primarily aimed at Primary school aged students – (and man, there must have been very few Gloucestershire schools who didn’t visit the show), on Friday night grown-ups got to play with the technology in a special after-hours session between 8pm and 10pm.

Although it’s full-on, we love the #makershack and look forward to sharing the scientific benefits of engaging with clay, with festival visitors in 2021.

artist and co director at eastnor pottery and the flying potter jon williams

artist and co director at eastnor pottery and the flying potter jon williamsJob Title: Co-Director

Job description: Facilitating experiences (Eastnor Studio and the wider community) and maker of weird interactive pottery stuff.

Q1 What do you like doing when you are not working at the Pottery?

Surfing! but as you need the ocean for this I’ll settle for spin class, writing and mowing the lawn.

Q2 What is your favourite song of all time and why?

A Forest by The Cure. An incredible sonic journey with endless live versions…also, nothing was ever quite the same after hearing it for the first time.

Q3 What is your favourite drink?

A bottle of Tribute

Q4 What is your favourite cheese?

Stilton

Q5 How many pairs of shoes do you own?

6, but rarely stray from my Air Force 1’s handed up from my son!

Q6 If you were an animal what would it be?

A barn owl

 

Aimee from eastnor pottery herefordshire displaying terracotta totem pole created by all the children at meadows first school in bromsgrove

Aimee from eastnor pottery herefordshire displaying terracotta totem pole created by all the children at meadows first school in bromsgroveIn Autumn term 2019, Jon the Potter visited Meadows First School in Bromsgrove to work with the whole school creating this amazing collaborative totem pole.

The residency took place over two days and Jon set up his mobile pottery studio in the adjoining Parkside Middle School art room. Individual classes took turns to visit the art room to make their modelled contribution to the sculpture before the piece was transported away to be fired in sections at Eastnor Pottery.

Jon has now delivered the separate pieces of the totem and the whole artwork will be erected in the children’s Well Being Garden. As soon as it’s up, well get some photos of the totem in-situ and publish them here on the blog.