Archive for fired examples

Variety is the spice…

Hand made mug made by workshop participant at Eastnor Pottery in West MidlandsEach pot made on a potter’s wheel by a first time participant is totally unique. The shape is as individual to its maker as their very own fingerprint – everybody holds their hands in a different way.

Once participants have experienced the joys of making a pot, they are offered the opportunity to further individualise their freshly thrown ware by decorating with coloured slips and underglazes.

The variety of approach to colour and theme is awe inspiring. Just take a look at the multitude of effects (and shapes) of these recently fired & glazed customer creations.

A sample of Eastnor Pottery’s customers creations made on the potter’s wheel and hand decorated.

Meadows books & damson trees

gruffalo tile panel created by pupils at meadows first school in bromsgroveHere at Eastnor Pottery, process is king! It’s all about the journey and we greatly value and enjoy observing how our customers and workshop participants engage with the clay and their relationship with environment and individuals around them. That said, we oversee some pretty inspiring and sophisticated end products too!

Check out these ‘book’ tile panels inspired by children’s literature we co-created with Meadows first School in Bromsgrove. We spent x2 industrious days working with the entire school, each child producing a single tile. The tiles have been assembled onto boards and will adorn the front of the school for community and visitors alike to admire when they visit the school.

ceramic tile project with bromsgrove infants school meadows infant school with jon the potter from Eastnor PotteryA similar project with an equally satisfying outcome was the Damson Tree tile panel made with Damson Wood First School in Solihull. This project was initiated to celebrate the schools 50th birthday and the resulting ceramic masterpiece made by the children will hang in the reception hall.

Bee good!

glazed bowls with sgraffito bee designLove the sgraffito work on these bowls made by one of our regular customers.

Rachel attended one of our one day potter’s wheel workshops and as a result, qualified for our £10 an hour, semi-supervised studio rental. So far she’s been back three or four times perfecting her throwing technique and creating some stunning surface decoration.

I don’t think readers will be too surprised to learn that she’s an artist and has an online presence: OldAshArt

Creatives ‘R’ us!


Creative practitioners who work in other media are often inquisitive and keen to try new materials. So, as one might expect, we do get to encounter more than our fair share of artists and craftspeople wanting to translate their ideas into clay.

We love working with fellow creatives and are delighted when we get the opportunity to do so.

Check out this amazing collaborative pot made by illustrator Sarah Dean and her family to commemorate her 40th birthday.

Although the pot looked pretty amazing in terracotta, Sarah had other ideas about the finish! I’m sure you’ll agree the acrylic paint job looks magnificent and elevates the artwork to a new level.

Well done Sarah!

Weathering well

Head of a terracotta pheasant covered in frostA FAQ by our customers is “Can I put my pottery outside?”

If they are doing our ‘Make & Take’ option and transporting their raw, clay pieces home, then it’s a big NO NO! At the first sign of rain their creations will reduce to a sludge.

We recommend a couple of layers of PVA glue mixed with water (50/50 mix) to seal the surface. They can then decorate their object with whatever paint they may have to hand. BUT, under no circumstance should the object be left outside in the rain as it will break down in a down pour. Air-dried clay is definitely for interior, decorative purposes only.

Fired things have made an irreversible chemical change and are much more permanent. Rain & sunshine will have little effect. Snow, frost and ice however, can be detrimental to fired ceramic. It’s all to do with the temperature the clay has been fired to.

The higher the temperature, the more likely the clay particles will have fused together forming an impenetrable material. It’s called vitrification. If on the other hand, if you have a relatively low fired pot, the clay particles will not have fused so much, resulting in the ceramic material being softer and porous to liquids.

As water freezes, it expands. So if you have a low fired pot, the water is going to soak into the body and when it freezes, the ice expands with enough force to fracture the material. Hence cracking and chipping occurs – frost damage.

If we know our customers work is heading for the garden, we will suggest an appropriate clay and purposely high fire the object.

Our Pottery garden is full of high fired terracotta – some of the pieces have been out in all weathers for 20 years or more and they still look pretty good with very little frost damage.

 

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